Man suspected of terrorist act for taking picture of daughter

Banned from mall over 'terror concerns'

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Banned from mall over 'terror concerns'

The terrorist act in progress

An overly ambitious mall cop tried to confiscate a father’s phone after he had taken a picture of his daughter eating ice cream.

Chris White, 45, was at the Braehead Shopping Center in Glasgow, Scotland, with his 4-year-old daughter when he pulled out his phone to take a picture of her. He was soon approached by a mall security guard who demanded White delete the photo, and asked him to leave the shopping center and not return.

According to FoxNews, the guard called the police, and White was told that they had the right to confiscate White’s phone through the country’s Prevention of Terrorism Act, which gives police expanded powers when dealing with somebody suspected of being a terrorist.

On a Facebook page set up by White to encourage shoppers to boycott Braehead, he said the guard called police and that his “daughter was crying by this stage.” White was allowed to keep his phone and the photos, in exchange for providing personal details such as his place of birth, address, and employment status.

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White said that if he did not have his daughter with him, who he is “trying to bring our daughter up to respect and trust police officers,” that he “may have exercised [his] right not to provide those details.”

A Braehead spokesman told Fox in a statement that the workers manning the ice cream counter “became suspicious” of White when he started taking pictures, thinking that he had also been snapping photos of the staff as well.

He added, “Like most shopping centers, we have a photography policy in the mall to protect the privacy of the staff and shoppers. However, it is not our intention to — and we do not — stop innocent family members from taking pictures.”

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  • LD

    I know this looks bad in context with world under scrutiny for terrorism, but even 30 years ago when I was dong photography as a hobby, I never took photos in a crowded building or in businesses where employees didn’t know me. While what this man may have been doing is completely innocent, the fact remains that if he didn’t know the employees in this particular setting he should have limited himself to one shot that did not intimidate others who probably didn’t want to be photographed. I was in a public library last year when a Japanese man began snapping cell photos of library patrons. When he leveled his camera at me I threw a fit. He acted like he didn’t understand me at first, then put it away when began shouting at him to stop. Had we been outside at the beach, no problem. Again, outside a building where people don’t know you, that’s always been taboo. I think this kind of behavior is fallout from the Crowley do anything you like generation, which bled naturally off to domestic terrorism through the CIA. Not a perfect world, and for those who lack an understanding of the culture it can be a painful experience to attempt to press a personal agenda against laws that are now in place to do just about anything required to shut you down, which is an inverse application of Crowley. I know, paradox, but if you don’t like it then you aught to pay more attention to who is running government. Sad for the child, but I’ve seen the PATRIOT Act used worse in the US where children this age have actually been put in handcuffs and even handcuffed to a school desk for less. All true.