Frat boy abandoned at hospital with post-it note

May 16th, 2013 by | Permalink
Frat boy left at hospital with note after suffering from alcohol poisoning. Photo via Katia Grimmer-Laversanne.

Frat boy left at hospital with note after suffering from alcohol poisoning. Photo via Katia Grimmer-Laversanne.

An unconscious 20-year-old Arizona State University student was abandoned at a Tempe hospital Saturday night after his fraternity brothers left him there with a post-it note attached to his body.

Aidan Mohr was found sitting in a wheelchair in the emergency room at St. Luke’s Hospital with a sticky note that read, “I’ve been drinking and I need some help.”

Mohr’s fraternity brothers admitted to leaving him there with the note because they were afraid they would get in trouble. Mohr was apparently suffering from alcohol poisoning after allegedly downing some 20 shots of tequila during a drinking challenge at frat party earlier that evening. When Mohr started convulsing and turning blue, one of his fraternity brothers tried taking him to his house to detox, but later decided that Mohr needed medical help.

The Sigma Alpha Epsilon members were concerned because Mohr had engaged in underage drinking, although it is not clear if the party was officially sanctioned by the fraternity or not reported KPTV. The fraternity has drawn scrutiny and criticism after another one its members, Jack Culolias, 19-years-old, drowned last fall after consuming alcohol at one of their parties. Culolias was apparently asked to leave a party after he was found urinating off a balcony, he was later found dead in the Salt river in Tempe, Arizona.

After consuming 20 shots of tequila Saturday night, Mohr’s blood alcohol level was .47, over three times the legal limit of intoxication. Mohr is expected to make a full recovery however.

Sigma Alpha Epsilon officials issued a statement on Tuesday, saying the incident was being investigated.

Arizona State University (ASU)) leaders also issued a statement condemning the behavior, claiming it is not indicative of their 73,000 students. They admonished the practice of binge drinking and promoted their substance abuse programs to at-risk students.

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